Avoiding the Three Common Marketing Mistakes

Creating your products is just the beginning of having a thriving product-based business.  Marketing, which is the next important component in your business, encompasses a wide range of techniques and tips that I will not go into here.  Let’s just address the three most common marketing mistakes.

Artsy Shark’s guest blogger Kimberly Houston describes the 3 mistakes as follows:

The Three Marketing Mistakes

The three marketing mistakes are: #1, not knowing who your ideal clients/collectors are #2, not knowing what your USP (unique selling proposition, or what I call your “meaningful difference”) is, which leads to #3: generic website copy that lacks a clear, persuasive marketing message, the kind that compels your visitors to stick around and explore your website, your work, and become interested in buying.

Let’s address each of these mistakes individually:

Not knowing who your ideal clients/collectors areAvoiding the Three Common Marketing Mistakes

You need to conduct your marketing in an orderly fashion.  In other words, once you develop a product or line of products, you don’t start out with trying to pitch Walmart on stocking your items.  I highly recommend you first exhibit at a farmer’s market, craft fair, or mall kiosk.  These venues are typically affordable and will allow you to connect one-on-one with your potential customers.  While you engage with your customers, you will hear wonderful comments and feedback that help you discover who your ideal customers are and hear some interesting suggestions on how to make your products more saleable.

Not knowing what your USP (unique selling proposition, or what I call your “meaningful difference”)

Along with discovering who your ideal customer is, developing your unique selling proposition is the next important step in your marketing process. Your USP is the ‘meaningful difference’ that makes your product stand out from the other products in the marketplace.

So what is different about what you create?  Maybe you use organic or specialized ingredients in your gourmet food products; or you use an antique method for creating your handcrafted items; or maybe you use special-cut gems or minerals in your jewelry.  These are all USP that should be included in your marketing materials.

Generic website copy that lacks a clear, persuasive marketing message, the kind that compels your visitors to stick around and explore your website, your work, and become interested in buying.

Nothing deters sales more, in my opinion, than looking at a website that screams buy me, buy me to anyone scrolling through your site.  Your first page, in particular, should speak to your ideal customer explaining your unique selling proposition.  People need a reason WHY to buy your products!  What will your items do for THEM?

Read the full article for more tips

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